Prayers, Tears One Year After Yolanda

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Simply 'D BEST

mass-grave-yolanda-3Nagpalipad ng mga kalapati ang mga residente sa mass grave ng mga nasawi sa “Yolanda” kasunod ng misa bilang paggunita sa unang taong anibersaryo kahapon ng super typhoon na nanalasa sa Kabisayaan. (AP)

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[Press Release] 1,000 kilometer, 40-day Climate Walk Marches to Ground Zero Tacloban on Typhoon Haiyan Anniversary

Human Rights Online Philippines

1,000 kilometer, 40-day Climate Walk led by Philippine Chief Negotiator for UN Climate Talks
Marches to Ground Zero Tacloban on Typhoon Haiyan Anniversary

The ship that ravaged a community still stands as a reminder of what happened one year ago during typhoon Yolanda's landfall. www.facebook.com/ClimateWalkNow The ship that ravaged a community still stands as a reminder of what happened one year ago during typhoon Yolanda’s landfall. http://www.facebook.com/ClimateWalkNow
Dubbed as the Climate Walk: A People’s Walk for Climate Justice, the march gathered various environmental groups, celebrities, government officials, faith groups, youth, and individuals[i] during its launch last October 2 in Luneta, Manila, the International Day for Non-Violence, to take on a 40-day walk to reach Tacloban City on November 8, the first anniversary of the super typhoon’s historic land fall.

Led by Philippine Negotiator to UN Climate Change Talks and Climate Change Commissioner Naderev “Yeb” Saño, the Climate Walk campaigned for local governments to commit to taking action against the climate crisis by committing to draft their own Local Climate Change Action Plans…

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Super Typhoon Yolanda – One Year Anniversary

International Social Network in Manila

It’s the one year anniversary of Super Typhoon Yolanda’s (Hainan) destructive visit to the Philippines.  Yolanda left a loss of lives and livelihoods in her wake and the country still struggles through recovery.

Despite the tragic and widespread losses, Filipinos are noted for their resilience, for their ability to smile in the face of tragedy.  Undas, or All-Saints and All-Souls days, November 1 and 2, is typical of this where families congregate around the graves of their departed combining a fiesta-like atmosphere with mourning (or turning mourning into a Fiesta?)

In this spirit, ALIG wanted to reach out to its extended family with another Thank You for supporting our Yolanda relief efforts and celebrate what ALIG accomplished with your help.

I wasn’t personally involved in ALIG’s massive effort (other than dropping off toothbrushes and flip flops,) but what impresses me, and why I want to celebrate the accomplishments…

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A Photojournalist’s ‘Yolanda’ Experience

THE MURALLA

by Harmony Valdoz |

For fifteen days, a makeshift mat of carton on the floor of a storm-ravaged hotel in Tacloban served as the bed for Rene Dilan, chief photographer of The Manila Times. It was a week after Yolanda struck parts of Visayas, and to head to the area of destruction was what he had to do for his job.

For those of us who live hundreds of miles away and were spared of the typhoon’s wrath, the most powerful way we have felt its magnitude without actually experiencing it is through media; through video footages and pictures – through cameras. But the unsung heroes behind these photographs have a thousand words to tell, too.

1 Destruction left by Typhoon Yolanda | Photo by Rene Dilan

Dilan is no stranger to challenging coverages. To name a few, he has seen the aftermath of the deluge in Real, Infanta, and General…

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The Generosity Gene

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7/68 Credit: @streetretra 7/68 Credit: @streetretra

Filipinos are generous. Their country remains blighted by poverty and often politics but that doesn’t dim their gift for giving. According to the World Giving Index 2013 by British organization Charities Aid Foundation, the Philippines is the 16th most generous country out of 146 countries included in the study. Almost all of the countries above it on the list are developed economies.

The index ranked countries based on three “giving behaviors”: donating money to a charity, volunteering time for an organization, and helping strangers. Filipinos scored extremely highly for helping a stranger and volunteering.

These attributes were on display when Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines one year ago. Haiyan, known as Yolanda here, struck on 8 November 2013 sending massive ocean swells surging inland in many parts of the central Philippines. More than one million homes were damaged or destroyed. The official casualty count is 6,300 and…

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After the wave: one year on from Typhoon Haiyan

Tess McClure

Leslie, 24, lives with his daughter in Yolanda Village: a no-man's land between the city and the sea. Leslie, 24, lives with his daughter in Yolanda Village: a no-man’s land between the city and the sea.

 

The strongest tropical storm ever recorded devastated the Philippines last year. On the anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan, Tess McClure travels to the epicenter of the damage to see what has changed and what the New Zealand presence in the area has been.

Leslie still remembers the wave.

He remembers the sound of it, most of all. The sound of his friends, calling out around him in the dark.

He still dreams some nights of their voices out in the water, he says. Wakes up on hot black nights and hears people calling for help.

“I dream of shouting people. I do not know where they are right now. I know they are gone.”

He remembers looking back and seeing ships, riding the wave as it rushed into shore, above the houses, above…

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Remembering Haiyan

Regine's Haven

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Commemorating Haiyan’s first year anniversary after it struck the Philippines and hearing again the stories of survival and strained experiences from the people who were greatly affected by the super typhoon brought back memories as if they were fresh from yesterday. I remembered being far from my loved ones who were in the affected areas during that time gave me sleepless nights and unstable peace of mind because of fear and worry. Addition to the burden was the social media which was poorly compensating with the depression felt by the audience who were hoping to catch some good news but all we got were news of many casualties and of how devastated the areas were. But I never stopped watching television and browsing sites for any updates. My faith was the only thing I held on to back then. But few days of not hearing anything from my relatives made…

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The day of the storm

Days

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We were the lucky ones, surviving Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda with relatively minor (compared to our neighbors) damage to the house. We were far from the area hit by the storm surge, but still strong winds tore off a part of the roof and rainwater soaked the ceiling and flooded the house.

Going around town, Palo, after the storm subsided, I could see how Haiyan/Yolanda ravaged the place. More than the physical damage was the feeling of despair that hung thick in the air.

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“It Looks Like Actual Hell On Earth”

salamat168

Almost a year has passed when German local newspaper Prima Sonntag reported on the situation in the Philippines and especially those regions that had been affected by typhoon Yolanda/Haiyan. This article helped us a lot to raise funds and thus help those people whose houses and belongings had been destroyed. According to unfpa.org, about 14 million people have been affected, therefore aid in all areas was essential for survival. All kinds of help was needed, in every places, because regarding the huge number of victims and the difficulty of reaching everyone due to the destruction and the fact that the Philippines consist of over 7,000 islands, it is understandable that it was not easy to help everyone immediately. The better it was when we received help from people in Germany, Switzerland and the Philippines to help even more people.

“It looks like actual hell on earth” and unfortunately for many, it even…

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The Strongest Typhoon Ever Recorded – One Year After Yolanda/Haiyan

salamat168

Typhoon Yolanda/Haiyan - One Year

A year has passed since the most devastating and strongest typhoon ever recorded swept over the islands of the Philippines. According to unfpa.org, about 14 million people have been affected. This has been a trauma for many people, and Filipinos all over the world came together, prayed for and helped their fellow people who have been victimized by the calamities. We are all very thankful for all the help we have received in order to buy and distribute goods for all those in need. This help came from Switzerland and Germany thanks to our local newspaper, Prima Sonntag, and our friends.

One year after, I want to inform you about the effects of Yolanda/Haiyan. Here are some facts gathered from UNHCR:

Date: November 8th, 2013
Deaths: ca. 6,300
Displaced people: ca. 4.1 million
People who still don’t have a home: ca. 20,000
Displacement sites across affected areas:…

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