#RRT8: Spreading Christmas Cheer in Northern Cebu

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Random Road Trip

#RRT spreads the love in Daanbantayan!

Random Road Trip visits Daanbantayan in northern Cebu to give gifts and to spread Christmas cheer to the people who were greatly affected by Typhoon Yolanda in November 2013. 

Typhoon Haiyan (locally called Yolanda) – the biggest storm that hit planet earth. How do you deal with that kind of headline in CNN? How do you prepare yourself for that gigantic swirling storm outside? You don’t.

The three hour drive to the north was a mix of emotions. We were elated to be able to help our fellow Cebuanos but at the same time when we saw the amount of destruction as we neared the tip of Cebu – we felt sad. Tin roofs look like they were crumpled like that of a regular paper, fields of trees look like it has been swept by a giant broom, and the most disheartening of all were…

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Prayers, Tears One Year After Yolanda

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Simply 'D BEST

mass-grave-yolanda-3Nagpalipad ng mga kalapati ang mga residente sa mass grave ng mga nasawi sa “Yolanda” kasunod ng misa bilang paggunita sa unang taong anibersaryo kahapon ng super typhoon na nanalasa sa Kabisayaan. (AP)

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REMEMBER 11/8

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Today marks the first anniversary of a tragedy that took thousands of lives and affected millions. Supertyphoon Haiyan/Yolanda destroyed everything on its path.

But not the Filipino spirit.

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Slowly, the affected cities are standing up. Yes, we are slowly moving on.

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Thanks to the countless modern-heroes of our lifetime. People from around the world joined hands and did everything they can -big or small contributions – to help other people in catastrophe. That’s humanity at work!

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In behalf of everyone affected by this tragedy, THANK YOU. You know who you are. We may not know you. You may be an anonymous and unrecognized. Your name may not be here on this site – but rest assured, your good deed was written in the book of Heavens. And in our hearts, you are deeply appreciated. Forever.

Ryan Chua

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Heroes

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Wonder Foundation in UK

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Estancia pledges support to UN-Habitat shelter recovery project

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Rebuilding for a better urban future

UN Habitat, together with its partner, Hilti Foundation, recently held a meeting with the town administrators of Estancia to discuss the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlement Project, which identified a potential beneficiary community in Poblacion Zone 1 of the municipality.

Project Manager, Mr. Robert Deutsch, introduced UN Habitat’s plan of constructing typhoon-resistant houses for over 600 families in various parts of Western Visayas that were devastated by Yolanda. He also added that the project would also cover the training of local skilled workers on building robust shelters and the repair and improvement of key community infrastructures.  

Ms. Nerissa Piamonte discussed the integration of Hilti Foundation’s bamboo shelter model into the core house design. The organization strongly advocates the optimization of locally available and sustainable construction materials.

Standing in for Mayor Rene Cordero, the executive administrators, Ms. Ninfa Nacionales and Ms. Lina Acosta, expressed their gratitude to UN…

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YOLANDA

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organized chaos.

Serendipity in the Philippines. I have stopped questioning what brought me to this particular place in the world. It certainly wasn’t the result of a grand quest by any means. The wheels were in motion when I first applied for an internship in Jamaica almost one year ago. As fate would have it, I was reassigned. All I knew was this: in spite of the earthquakes, the brownouts, floods, typhoons, and more brownouts, I couldn’t have been more grateful to be where I was, right there in Iloilo City. Words escape me when I think about the people I met in those 7 months, and the scenes I saw in those final two. It is my sincerest hope that no one will ever have to endure the variety of nature’s torment as Filipinos do. Truth be told, I don’t think any other people in the world could shoulder that kind…

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Anno Yolanda

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ok go

Joe lives in Palo and I arrange to meet him there so I find a bus. The road to Palo runs south along the coast. It was the communities along this road which took the greatest impact of the storm. Having seen pictures of the worst of the damage, the severity of the damage is not now what strikes me. It’s the extent of it. The road to Palo is an unbroken line of all types of buildings: houses, shops, offices, factories and municipal buildings. Barely a single building along the ten-mile journey is in one piece. Many are simply completely wrecked. The larger buildings obviously stand out. One is the Convention Centre. It’s right on the seafront. Because of its size, many people evacuated here during Yolanda. Because of its position, it was completely overcome by the 50ft waves which battered everything on the coastline. Everyone who sheltered there…

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Left behind

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No Big Deal

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After the typhoon in the Philippines last November, millions were left homeless.
Twelve-year-old Adrian is one of them.

He is living in the Tacloban bunkhouse created for survivors who lost everything.
How he found himself there is nothing short of amazing.

To understand his story, we have to go back in time.

NOVEMBER 7 was a perfect day on Leyte Island – bright and sunny, a small breeze.

For Adrian, it was a perfect play day – one meant for climbing trees. He scrambled up and down giant mango trees and plucked ripe fruit with his friends – four children who lived in the big house next door.

Together, they filled baskets on the ground below.

“It’s one of my favourite things to do,” Adrian says.

When a typhoon warning was issued that day, people along the coastline were urged to evacuate. Police circled Adrian’s neighbourhood and told families to…

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